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Continuous, enhanced detection of droplet contents in electrical impedance spectroscopy

The inventors at UCI have developed a method and system to make enhanced electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements in a continuously flowing train of microfluidic droplets. The technique increases the sensitivity of the electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements, lowering detection limits and increasing the frequency of continuous measurements.

Controllable Emulsification And Point-Of-Care Assays Driven By Magnetic Induced Movement Of The Fluid

UCLA researchers in the department of Bioengineering have developed a novel microfluidic droplet generation technique, where instead of pumps, only magnetic force is used for controllable emulsification of ferrofluid containing solutions. 

Regulating the Microbiome with Disease-Associated Genes

Background: Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a chronic condition with substantial health and economic costs, affecting 1.3M people in the US. Currently, there is a lack of precise understanding of IBD and therefore, many are misdiagnosed or not even diagnosed at all. There is a high demand for effective and preventative therapies to reduce the burdens of IBD. Most of the time, patients have to resort to surgery which is a very expensive and invasive process. The IBD market is expected to be $9.6B in 2017 and is projected to show robust growth due to increasing IBD prevalence.   Brief Description: UCR researchers have discovered a novel gene that can be modulated to control the microbiome. It is also the first evidence of identifying a specific bacteria in a mouse model of human disease. This discovery will allow for insight into how and which human disease-associated genes are involved in modifying the microbiome to offer better therapeutic solutions in alleviating the disease.

Sensitive, Specific Ratiometric Fluorescence-based DNA Detection

Fluorescent silver nanoclusters for nucleic acid detection. 

Methods For Obtaining A Synthetic Long Sequencing Read Using Short Read Sequencing

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a method to increase the functional read length of existing short read next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies through a novel library preparation that maintains contiguous coverage of long sequences. 

Versatile Cas9-Mediated Integration Technology

Many advancements to the Cas9 system (both the Cas9 nuclease and the sgRNA sequence) have been made to increase and optimize its efficiency and specificity.  Since many diseases and traits in humans have a complex genetic basis, multiple genomic targets must be simultaneously edited in order for diseases to be cured or for traits to be impacted.  Thus in order for CRISPR/Cas9 to be an effective gene therapeutic technology, huge swathes of the genome must be edited simultaneously, efficiently, and accurately. To address many of these issues, UC Berkeley researchers have developed a system method to rapidly manipulate multiple loci. This system allows for either sequential (maintaining inducible Cas9 present in the genome) or simultaneous (scarless excision) manipulation of Cas9 itself and can be applied to any organism currently utilizing the CRISPR technology.  The system can also be applied conveniently to create genomic libraries, artificial genome sequences, and highly programmable strains or cell lines that can be rapidly (and repeatedly) manipulated at multiple loci with extremely high efficiency.  

Salmonella-Based Gene Delivery Vectors and their Preparation

Nucleic acid-based gene interference technologies, including ribozymes and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), represent promising gene-targeting strategies for specific inhibition of mRNA sequences of choice. A fundamental challenge to use nucleic acid-based gene interfering approaches for gene therapy is to deliver the gene interfering agents to appropriate cells in a way that is tissue/cell specific, efficient and safe. Many of the currently used vectors are based on attenuated or modified viruses, or synthetic vectors in which complexes of DNA, proteins, and/or lipids are formed in particles, and tissue-specific vectors have been only partially obtained by using carriers that specifically target certain cell types. As such, efficient and targeted delivery of M1GS sequences to specific cell types and tissues in vivo is central to developing this technology for gene targeting applications. Invasive bacteria, such as Salmonella, possess the ability to enter and transfer genetic material to human cells, leading to the efficient expression of transferred genes. Attenuated Salmonella strains have earlier been shown to function as a carrier system for delivery of nucleic acid-based vaccines and anti-tumor transgenes. Salmonella-based vectors are low cost and easy to prepare. Furthermore, they can be administrated orally in vivo, a non-invasive delivery route with significant advantage. Thus, Salmonella may represent a promising gene delivery agent for gene therapy. Scientists at UC Berkeley have developed a novel attenuated strain of Salmonella, SL101, which exhibited high gene transfer activity and low cytotoxicity/pathogenicity while efficiently delivering ribozymes, for expression in animals. Using MCMV infection of mice as the model, they demonstrated that oral inoculation of SL101 in animals efficiently delivered RNase P-based ribozyme sequence into specific organs, leading to substantial expression of ribozyme and effective inhibition of viral infection and pathogenesis. This strategy could easily be adopted deliver other gene targeting technologies.

Diagnostic and Screening Methods for Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic itch and inflammatory disorder of the skin that affects one in ten people. Patients suffering from severe AD eventually progress to develop asthma and allergic rhinitis, in a process known as the “atopic march.” Signaling between epithelial cells and innate immune cells via the cytokine Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP) is thought to drive AD and the atopic march. TSLP is up regulated in atopic dermatitis patients and is thought to act on immune cells to trigger atopic dermatitis. Scientists at UC Berkeley discovered that TSLP also activates a subset of sensory neurons to signal itch by acting on TSLPR, which signals to TRPA1. They demonstrated that sensory neurons that transmit itch signals in AD are the only instance of signaling between TSLPR and TRPA1 in the same cell type. Therefore, blocking the signaling between TSLPR and TRPA1 is a novel and specific target for therapeutics for itch in atopic dermatitis. They also discovered that the Orai I/Stim I pathway triggers expression and secretion of TSLP. This pathway has never been directly demonstrated in human primary keratinocytes and has never before been linked to TSLP. Decreasing expression of Orai I or stim I using siRNA, or the downstream transcription factor, NFATc I, significantly attenuates TSLP secretion, as proven in mice studies. Thus inhibition of Orai I/Stim I/NFATc I signaling pathway is a novel target for therapeutics for itch in atopic dermatitis.

Monoclonal Antibody Against Cer164 (Clone 11)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human centrosomal protein 164kDa (Cep164). This antibody binds to the phosphorylation site of Cep164 and has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against ATR-IP (Clone 5)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human ATR-interacting protein (ATR-IP). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against Cer164 (Clone 26)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human centrosomal protein 164kDa (Cep164). This antibody binds to the phosphorylation site of Cep164 and has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against PNPase (Clone 4C11)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human mitochondrial polyribonucleotide nucleotidyltransferase 1 (PNPase). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against Pnpase (Clone 2A2)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human mitochondrial polyribonucleotide nucleotidyltransferase 1 (PNPase). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibodies Against Spc24/25 (Clone 2A10)

Mouse hybridoma cell line secret antibody against the human Kinetochore protein Spc24 (SPC24) and Kinetochore protein Spc25 (SPC25). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibodies Against Spc24/25 (Clone 2C8)

Mouse hybridoma cell line secret antibody against the human Kinetochore protein Spc24 (SPC24) and Kinetochore protein Spc25 (SPC25). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Method For Detecting Protein-Specific Glycosylation

O-GlcNAc modification is a common form of post-translational modification that mediates cellular activity and stem cell programming by modifying transcription factors. Multiple human diseases, including cancer and diabetes, have been linked to aberrant O-GlcNAcylation of specific proteins.Despite the importance of this modification, current methods for detection require advanced instrumentation and expertise as well as arduously enriched or purified samples. The “Glyco-seq” method developed by UC Berkeley researchers is highly sensitive, easy to use, and enables O-GlcNAc detection on proteins of interest in cell lysate. 

Self-Inactivating Targeted DNA Nucleases For Gene Therapy

The clinical application of targeted nucleases - such as zinc-finger nucleases, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 – are exciting genome editing platforms. Delivery of nucleases to cells and tissues using as viral methods, however, can leave the nucleases stably present in the target cells, even after editing has been accomplished. One major safety concern is off-target effects (i.e. cutting a non-intended site), which pose a safety risk.  Another safety concern for gene therapies is the long-term expression of a foreign protein potentially provoking inflammatory reactions, another safety risk.   To avoid these potential detrimental outcomes, researchers at UC Berkeley have modified the delivered nuclease DNA which will cleave the host genome target DNA site and also excise its own DNA from the stable delivered construct.  The researchers have shown that there is no trace of any active delivered DNA remaining, thus mitigating the harmful side effects from nuclease based gene therapy.

Multiplex Digital PCR

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed methods to enable greater multiplexing abilities for digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) so that up to 100 genetic targets may be analyzed. In the past multiplexing of digital PCR samples has been limited to only one probe per color. However multiple probes may be labeled by using combinatorial encoding of color, exploiting reaction rates of PCR cycles and modulating the intensity of Taqman and/or intercalating dyes therefore allowing a greater number of probes to be labeled.

Monoclonal Antibody against ATR-IP (Clone 11)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human ATR-interacting protein (ATR-IP). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against CEP164 (Clone 13)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human centrosomal protein 164kDa (Cep164). This antibody binds to the phosphorylation site of Cep164 and has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against CEP164 (Clone 17)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human centrosomal protein 164kDa (Cep164). This antibody binds to the phosphorylation site of Cep164 and has been tested for use in immunoprecipitation and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibodies Against Chk2 (Clone 4B8)

Mouse monoclonal antibody (clone 4B8) against the human Serine/threonine-protein kinase Chk2. This antibody has been tested for use in immunoprecipitation and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibodies Against Mtpap (Clone 1D3)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human Poly (A) RNA polymerase, mitochondrial (mtPAP). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

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