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A non-destructive method of quantifying mRNA in a single living cell

The detection of levels of messenger RNA (mRNA), the molecule used by DNA to convey information about protein production, is a very important method in molecular biology. Current detection strategies, such as Northern Blotting and RT-PCR, require destruction of the cell to extract such information. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a method to non-destructively assess mRNA levels in a single living cell.

Combined Optical Micromanipulation & Interferometric Topography

Background: Optical tweezers (OTs) is a commonly used light-based technology with a broad range of applications in studying mechanobiology. While OTs are capable of making force measurements at the pico-Newton level, they cannot be used to provide size and structural information on the object being investigated. The platform technology developed at UCR provides simultaneous measurements of force and physical dimensions. Currently, many leading manufacturers for nanoanalytic instruments are expanding their operations in North America and Asia to support the growth of its application in the scientific community.   Brief Description: UCR researchers have developed COMMIT, an all-optical platform, by combining optical tweezers and a novel microscopy method. COMMIT allows for simultaneous measurement of nano-sized objects and pN forces. Existing methods call for fluorescent labels and lack high resolution in imaging. This platform facilitates dynamic measurement of transient nanomechanical properties of cells in real-time.

Engineered-Microparticle-Based Cell Carriers For Culture And Adhesive Flow Cytometry

The Di Carlo group at UCLA has invented a microparticle that enables the analysis of adherent cells by flow cytometry. In addition, they have developed a high-throughput method to fabricate these microparticles.

Apparatus and Method for 2D-based Optoelectronic Imaging

The use of electric fields for signaling and manipulation is widespread, mediating systems spanning the action potentials of neuron and cardiac cells to battery technologies and lab-on-a-chip devices. Current FET- and dye-based techniques to detect electric field effects are systematically difficult to scale, costly, or perturbative. Researchers at the University of California Berkeley have developed an optical detection platform, based on the unique optoelectronic properties of two-dimensional materials that permits high-resolution imaging of electric fields, voltage, acidity, strain and bioelectric action potentials across a wide field-of-view.

An Optical System for Parallel Acquisition of Raman Spectra from a 2-Dimensional Laser Beam Array

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a method for acquiring Raman spectra from a plurality of laser interrogation spots in a two-dimensional array. This method can be used for parallel analysis of individual cells or for fast chemical imaging of specimens.

Ferromagnetic Infused Microstructure Arrays For Cell Sorting And Method Of Their Fabrication

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have invented a system for biological cell sorting using ferromagnetic infused microstructure arrays. The invented system is an adherent cell sorting platform with individually addressable growth substrates for specified cell release and collection using integrated magnetic structures. Some previous cell sorting methods have sacrificed the image clarity of the samples that they have sorted due to the process by which they sort cells. The invented micro array platform allows for the capture of individual components while also maintaining ideal imaging conditions.

Monoclonal Antibody Against Cer164 (Clone 11)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human centrosomal protein 164kDa (Cep164). This antibody binds to the phosphorylation site of Cep164 and has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against ATR-IP (Clone 5)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human ATR-interacting protein (ATR-IP). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against Cer164 (Clone 26)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human centrosomal protein 164kDa (Cep164). This antibody binds to the phosphorylation site of Cep164 and has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against PNPase (Clone 4C11)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human mitochondrial polyribonucleotide nucleotidyltransferase 1 (PNPase). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against Pnpase (Clone 2A2)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human mitochondrial polyribonucleotide nucleotidyltransferase 1 (PNPase). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibodies Against Spc24/25 (Clone 2A10)

Mouse hybridoma cell line secret antibody against the human Kinetochore protein Spc24 (SPC24) and Kinetochore protein Spc25 (SPC25). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibodies Against Spc24/25 (Clone 2C8)

Mouse hybridoma cell line secret antibody against the human Kinetochore protein Spc24 (SPC24) and Kinetochore protein Spc25 (SPC25). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Multi-Channel Microfluidic Piezoelectric Impact Printer

High-throughput, automated, large-scale microarray format assay in a short time frame and at low cost.

Electrical Transport Spectroscopy: An On-Chip Nanoelectronic Based Characterization Method

Researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at UCLA have recently developed electrical transport spectroscopy (ETS).

Adaptive optics with direct wavefront sensing for multi-photon microscope

Biological tissue are rarely transparent, presenting major challenges for deep tissue optical microscopy. With the advantages of high-resolution and viewing of live organisms, optical microscopy has become an important tool for biological research and continues to open new avenues in its capabilities. In recent years, image resolution and speed has been dramatically improved.  However the improvement of the resolution and penetration depth for optical microscopy is still in its infancy. As light passes through biological tissue, it can be absorbed, refracted and scattered, limiting the resolution and depth of optical imaging in biological tissues. Overcoming these challenges will benefit a wide range of applications from basic biological research to clinical investigations.

Microfluidic System for Particle Trapping and Separation

<p>Researchers have developed a novel system and method to rapidly separate particles from liquid. This technology demonstrates lab-on-a-chip potential for particle separation and/or purification. This technology is capable of processing a wide variety of molecules, ranging from cells to smaller biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acid. Applications of this technology include (but are not limited) use of it for particle separation and quantification for assays, cell preparation, and cell lysing and component separation.</p>

Microfluidic System for Particle Trapping and Separation

Researchers have developed a novel system and method to rapidly separate particles from liquid. This technology demonstrates lab-on-a-chip potential for particle separation and/or purification. This technology is capable of processing a wide variety of molecules, ranging from cells to smaller biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acid. Applications of this technology include (but are not limited) use of it for particle separation and quantification for assays, cell preparation, and cell lysing and component separation.

Monoclonal Antibody against ATR-IP (Clone 11)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human ATR-interacting protein (ATR-IP). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against CEP164 (Clone 13)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human centrosomal protein 164kDa (Cep164). This antibody binds to the phosphorylation site of Cep164 and has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against CEP164 (Clone 17)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human centrosomal protein 164kDa (Cep164). This antibody binds to the phosphorylation site of Cep164 and has been tested for use in immunoprecipitation and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibodies Against Chk2 (Clone 4B8)

Mouse monoclonal antibody (clone 4B8) against the human Serine/threonine-protein kinase Chk2. This antibody has been tested for use in immunoprecipitation and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibodies Against Mtpap (Clone 1D3)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human Poly (A) RNA polymerase, mitochondrial (mtPAP). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Methods and Compositions for Determining Differences in Taste Perception

People vary dramatically in their taste perception. What one person perceives as mild and pleasant, another will perceive as aversively spicy. Perception of piquancy, sweetness, sourness, temperature, bitterness, and other components of taste all vary across individuals in this way. Some substances, such as cilantro and phenylthiocarbamide, are famously polarizing, producing perceptual experiences that differ radically across individuals. Yet there is no universal system for measuring taste perception; people have a sense for what they like, but they cannot measure it or communicate it to others precisely. This means, for example, that food providers are left almost entirely in the dark, forced to cater to the average and not the individual. To address this need, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have created methods and compositions for consumable products to measure individual differences in taste perception. This innovative approach could lead to new products in support of a universal system for measuring taste perception, with an opportunity for consumers and retailers to understand food and beverage preferences in more precise, quantitative terms.

Design for Particle Manipulation Using Complex Flow Profiles

Researchers in UCLA Department of Bioengineering demonstrated the theoretical foundations of how inflection points of complex flow velocity profile can be used to create attractors in designed locations.

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