Browse Category:

Categories

[Search within category]

Targeted biological signal enhancement

This research tool consists of a two-vector system that can recruit an amplified biological signal to intra-cellular targets of interest.

ULTRAHIGH THROUGHPUT (UHT) MICROINJECTION

Microinjection represents the “gold standard” for cellular manipulation, due to its precision, safety, and applicability to a wide variety of cell types and molecules.  However, the reliance of current instrumentation on skilled operators and serialized injection methodologies limits availability and throughput (~3 cells/min), thus hampering progress in many areas including ex-vivo cell therapies. Automation efforts have shown promise for improving success rates, but the expense of instrument complexity and limited gains in throughput (≤35 cells/min) have held back its universal adoption.    

4D Echo Particle Image Velocimetry Reconstruction of Cardiac Flows

Echo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a non-invasive ultrasonic technique used to image blood flow in patients. Particles that may be used as flow tracers with PIV include currently FDA approved contrast agents. Currently, 2D blood flow information obtained by echocardiography is widely used to diagnose cardiac dysfunction. While this 2D echocardiography method is useful, it does not provide sufficient accuracy for characterizing complex 3D flows in the heart. For example, it is difficult to accurately image flow patterns in the right heart or hearts of patients with congenital defects or quantify mitral regurgitation. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a new method for multi-planar 3D reconstruction of 2D Echo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) data. This method may be used to image and assess blood flows from the heart chambers in real-time therefore allowing 4D imaging of blood flows in the heart.

A Novel Rapid and Highly Sensitive Cell Based System for the Detection and Characterization of HIV

Dr. Benhur Lee and colleagues in the UCLA Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics have developed a novel system to detect and characterize HIV with unprecedented sensitivity and rapidity.  

String Matching in Hardware using the FM-Index

UC Researchers have developed a Field-Programmable-Gate-Array (FPGA) based hardware implementation that utilizes the FM-Index for exact pattern matching for string searching.  This method of FM-Index string matching has a higher effective throughput than brute force due to the higher number of character comparisons per cycle performed by the FM-Index.  Further, the speed of this method is in the order of two orders of magnitude greater than Bowtie software tools and ten to seventy times faster than the traditional method using FHAST.  

A Novel Reporter System that Detects DNA Mutations in Pluripotent Stem Cells

DNA mutation events (gene rearrangements, base-pair substitutions) cause genomic instability, and can lead to cell death or cancer. These events also potentially lead to gene dysfunction and genetic disorders. DNA mutation events have many possible causes, such as inherited mutations in genes involved in genomic integrity, or exposure to environmental toxins. Human stem cell technology, in which stem cells can be differentiated into any cell type in the body, has the great potential to advance the discovery of therapeutics for unmet medical needs. However, recent reports indicate increased DNA mutation frequency in stem cells, which limits their potential use for discovery or therapeutic purposes. Therefore, technologies that enable the detection of the different types of DNA mutations would advance the characterization and selection of human stem cell lines for discovery or therapeutic purposes, and help characterize the mutagenic potential of environmental toxins.

Methods and Implementations for Storing Sparse Vectors

This invention consists of a set of methods and algorithms to compress the information contained in large vectors of binary or integer variables. These vectors occur in a variety of applications where objects are represented by spectral fingerprints, which by nature tend to be large and sparse. By leveraging the power law distributions often observed in these spaces, researchers at UCI have developed new lossless compression methods using integer entropy coding. In contrast to current compression systems requiring 1024 bits to store each molecule, the UCI methods can achieve lossless compression to a mere 300-400 bits.

Plasmid Expressing Recombinant RILP-GST Protein

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a plasmid that expresses recombinant GST-RILP protein. RILP is a Rab7 effector protein and therefore selectively binds the GTP-bound form of Rab7.

Crop Improvement And Production Of Value-Added Compound Using The Rice Beta-Glucanase Genes, Gns2-Gns9

Patent rights to a group of novel rice beta-glucanase genes and the corresponding beta-glucanase enzymes are available for non-exclusive licensing.  The genes, and the gene promoters, are useful in a variety of transgenic monocot plants for achieving increased plant resistance to fungal infection, improved growth characteristics, biomass conversion and high levels of expression of heterologous protein in various tissues obtained from the plants.

Vectors for Antibody Expression

Brief description not available

Novel Recombinant Adenovirus Vectors for Tissue-Specific Gene Expression in Heart

Targeted gene delivery to somatic tissues has importance in both genetic research and therapeutics. One of the most effective gene delivery vectors known is the recombinant human adenoviruses, which possess high infectivity with respect to a broad range of tissue types. The low selectivity (as to tissue type) is a disadvantage of these vectors limiting their usefulness as an in vivo therapeutic. Vectors which combine high infectivity with tissue- specific expression are needed.

Transcriptional Activation Factors (cjun, Ap-2, Sp1, Ctf/nf-1)

Eukaryotic promoters are regulated by a combination of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins, general transcription initiation factors, and associated accessory factors. The sequence-specific transcription factors can be divided into several classes on the basis of the activation domains they posess. This disclosure relates to several Human cDNA clones and/or expression vectors encoding c-jun, AP2, SP1, and CTF/NF1 TAF genes. Reference; B.D. Dynlacht, et al., Isolation of Coactivators Associated with the TATA-Binding Protein That Mediate Transcriptional Activation. 1991. Cell 66:563-76

In Vitro Translation Vectors/drosophila Tafs

In Drosophila and human cells, the TATA binding protein (TBP) of the transcription factor IID (TFIID) complex is tightly associated with multiple subunits termed TBP-associated factors (TAFs) that are essential for mediating regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription. This diclosure makes available various cDNA expression clones encoding dTAFs 250, 150, 110, 80,60,40,30, and 30B (in vitro translation vectors) from Drosophila. References; C.P. Verrijzer, et al., Drosophila TAFII150: similarity to Yeast Gene TSM-1 and Specific Binding to Core Promoter DNA. 1994. Science 264:933-41 T. Hoey, et al., Molecular Cloning and Functional Analysis of Drosophila TAF110 Reveal Properties Expected of Coactivators. 1993. Cell 72; 247-60

Radio Antenna With Improved Support System

Radio antennas must maintain their paraboloid shape and directional positioning in order to work properly. However wind can load the antenna dish and cause it to lose its shape and position. To address this situation, researchers at UC Berkeley have developed a support system that strengthens antenna dishes and provides several structural enhancements. The support system consists of reinforcements that enable firm radial and torsional support as well as an optimal amount of axial flexibility and support. This design allows for a large open area so that azimuth and elevation-bearing systems can be positioned near to the reflector vertex. This positioning enables lower loads and less structural requirements for the pedestal and drives.

Radio Antenna With Reduced Interference

The performance of radio antennas can be degraded from interference caused by thermal radiation as well as signals traveling along the ground and reflected by the ground. To minimize these sources of interference, researchers at UC Berkeley have developed design enhancements for radio antennas. These refinements minimize thermal background noise as well as low radio frequency interference, and they don?t intercept radiation along the symmetry axis of the antenna, or any rays that reach the feed (detector).

Radio Antenna With Improved Feed System

Log-periodic antennas are capable of transmitting and receiving signals across a large bandwidth. However, their bandwidth range can be too large for the entire signal to be simultaneously digitized. To address this issue, researchers at UC Berkeley have developed an innovative feed for broadband antennas. This feed converts the broadband radio signals such that they can be more readily digitized and processed.

Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (fret)-based Sensor Of Rangtp-importin B Interaction

Scientists at the University of California Berkeley have designed FRET sensor of a complex of Ran-GTP-importin b that is a fluorescent protein construct consisting of Importin b-domain (IBB) of importin a flanked by fluorescent proteins (donor and acceptor) capable of FRET. The sensor functions as an indirect sensor of Ran-GTP through its Ran-GTP sensitive specific interaction with importin b. See: P. Kalab, Weis, K., and Heald, R. (2002), Visualization of a Ran-GTP Gradient in Interphase and Mitotic Xenopus Egg Extracts. Science, March 29, 2002, Vol. 295, 2452-2456. The small guanosine triphosphate Ran is loaded with guanosine tripohosphate (GTP) by the chromatin bound guanine nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 and releases import cargoes in the nucleus during interphase. In mitosis, Ran-GTP promotes spindle assembly around the chromosomes by locally discharging cargoes that regulate microtubule dynamics and organization. We used fluorescence energy transfer-based biosensors to visualize gradients of Ran-GTP and liberated cargoes around chromosomes in mitotic Xenopus egg extacts. Both gradients were required to assemble and maintain spindle structure. During interphase, Ran-GTP was highly enriched in the nucleoplasm, and a steep concentration difference between nuclear and cytoplasmic Ran-GTP was established, providing evidence for a Ran-GTP gradient surrounding chromosomes throughout the cell cycle.

Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (fret)-based Direct Sensor Of Rangtp

Scientists at the University of California Berkeley have designed FRET-based sensor of Ran-GTP that is a fluorescent protein construct consisting of Ran binding domain flanked by fluorescent proteins (donor and acceptor) capable of FRET. The sensor functions as: 1) a direct sensor of Ran-GTP, and 2) an indirect sensor of Ran-GTP-binding proteins such as importin-b family proteins. See: P. Kalab, Weis, K., and Heald, R. (2002), Visualization of a Ran-GTP Gradient in Interphase and Mitotic Xenopus Egg Extracts. Science, March 29, 2002, Vol. 295, 2452-2456. The small guanosine triphosphate Ran is loaded with guanosine tripohosphate (GTP) by the chromatin bound guanine nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 and releases import cargoes in the nucleus during interphase. In mitosis, Ran-GTP promotes spindle assembly around the chromosomes by locally discharging cargoes that regulate microtubule dynamics and organization. We used fluorescence energy transfer-based biosensors to visualize gradients of Ran-GTP and liberated cargoes around chromosomes in mitotic Xenopus egg extacts. Both gradients were required to assemble and maintain spindle structure. During interphase, Ran-GTP was highly enriched in the nucleoplasm, and a steep concentration difference between nuclear and cytoplasmic Ran-GTP was established, providing evidence for a Ran-GTP gradient surrounding chromosomes throughout the cell cycle.

Reagents To Study The Structure And Function Of The Prototype Map Kinase Scaffold Protein, Ste5

This invention makes available plasmids designed to express derivatives of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste5 protein tagged with an N-terminal in-frame (His)6 tract and a c-Myc epitope recognized by the monoclonal antibody, 9E10, and /or fused in-frame at either its N- or C-terminus to the Aequoria victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), or mutant derivatives of Ste5 in these contexts. References: Hasson et al. 1994. Mol. Cell Biol. 14:1054-65 Inouye et al. 1997. Science 278:103-6 Inouye et al. 1997. Genetics 147:479-92 Sette et al. 2000. Mol Biol. Cell 11:4033-49 Bardwell et al. 2001. J. Biol. Chem. 276:10374-86 Kunzler et al. 2001. Genetics 157:1089-105

Phage Dna From Listeria Monocytogenes

Listeria monocytogenes is a non-spore-forming, opportunistic Gram-positive pathogen, responsible for severe infections in both animals and humans. Recurrent outbreaks of Listeriosis have emphasized the need for better understanding of the molecular pathogenicity mechanisms and the interaction of the organism and specific bacteriophages. Investigators at University of California, Berkeley have made an integration vector carrying the integrase and attachment site of phage A118. References: Loessner et al. 2000. Mol. Microbiology 35:324-40. Fleming et al. 1985. New Eng. J. Med. 312:404-7

Recombinant Murine Cytomegalovirus Rvm78, And Its Related Reagents

Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous herpesvirus infecting more than 75% of the U.S population. It is a leading cause of birth defects in newborns, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised individuals, such as transplant recipients and patients with AIDS, and even in healthy adults, this virus causes a life-long subclinical infection that may be associated with the development of atherosclerosis. Study of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) serves as a model for understanding of HCMV- associated diseases. The reagents covered in this invention include (1) MCMV mutant (RvM78) that contained a mutation at viral open reading frame M78, (2) an expression plasmid construct (pM78-FLAG) that contains M78 coding sequence driven by an eukaryotic expression cassette, and (3) a mouse 3T3 cell line that contains pM78-Flag and expresses M78 protein. References: Zhan et al. 2000 Virology 266:264-74. Zhan et al. 2000 J. Virology 74:7411-21

Murine H60 Gene (plasmid) For Minor Histocompatibility Antigen

Minor histocompatibility (H) antigens elicit T cell responses and thereby cause chronic graft rejection and graft-vs.-host disease among MHC identical individuals. Although numerous independent H loci exist in mice of a given MHC haplotype, certain H antigens dominate the immune response and are thus of considerable conceptual and therapeutic importance. The H60 gene was isolated as a cDNA clone from the mouse strain BALB.B. This gene contains an antigenic peptide that elicits a strong cytotoxic T cell response when C57BL/6 mice are immunized with BALB.B spleen cells. References: Malarkannan et al. 1998. J Immunol. 161:3501-9. Karttunen et al. 1992. PNAS 89:6020-4.

Reporter Plasmid To Quantitate Filamentous-response-element (fre)-dependent Transcription

To assay transcription from promoters under the control of Filamentous Response Elements (FREs) which comprise binding sites for the transcription factors Ste7 and Tec1, investigators at UCB constructed a plasmid (YEpU-FTyZ) in which expression of the E. coli lacZ gene is driven by the FRE of the transposon Ty1. Reference; Cook et al. 1997 Nature 390:85-8.

Radio Antenna With Improved Broadband Performance

Log-periodic antennas provide the frequency independent performance that is necessary for applications in which large portions of the electromagnetic spectrum are scanned. However, the high frequency limit of these antennas is restricted because their amplifiers must be located far from the feed vertex so that they don?t interfere with radiation patterns ? and this in turn requires a long transmission line that results in unacceptable performance degradation. To address these issues, researchers at UC Berkeley have developed a non-planar log-periodic antenna that improves performance through several design refinements that include the ability to place an amplifier within the antenna. Small microwave telescopes that incorporate these design improvements can achieve unprecedented A/T over multi-octave bandwidths. In comparison to previous log-periodic antennas, this Berkeley design improves the gain, polarization purity, and transmission line losses. The antenna is capable of concurrent transmission or reception of two orthogonal polarization modes, and it includes elements that decrease the amount of cross-polarization coupling that occurs between the arms of the antenna. Moreover, this design also allows for the attachment of cryogenic electronics to enhance signal sensitivity and the performance of low noise amplifiers.

  • Go to Page:

University of California
Innovation Alliances and Services

1111 Franklin Street, 5th Floor,Oakland,CA 94607-5200 |
http://www.ucop.edu/ott/
Tel: 510.587.6000 | Fax: 510.587.6090 | UC.technologies@ucop.edu