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Non-Human Primate Adenovirus Model of Human Respiratory Disease

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a model of human respiratory disease using a titi monkey adenovirus.

Modulation Of p53 as a Cancer Therapeutic Target

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have designed peptides and oligonucleotide sequences to enhance p53 expression.

Methods for Global RNA-Chromatin Interactome Discovery

Recent decades of genomic research reveal that mammalian genomes are more prevalently transcribed than previously anticipated. It is now quite clear that mammalian genomes express not only protein-coding RNAs but also a large repertoire of non-coding RNAs that have regulatory functions in different layers of gene expression. Many of those regulatory RNAs appear to directly act on chromatin, as exemplified by various long noncoding RNAs (IncRNAs). Some of those regulatory RNAs mediate genomic interactions only in cis, while others, such MALAT1 and NEAT1, are capable of acting in trans. These findings suggest an emerging paradigm in regulated gene expression via specific RNA-chromatin interactions. Various techniques have been developed to localize specific RNAs on chromatin. These methods, such as chromatin Isolation by RNA purification or comprehensive identification of RNA binding proteins (ChIRP), capture hybridization analysis of RNA targets (CHART), and RNA affinity purification (RAP), all rely on using complementary sequences to capture a specific RNA followed by deep sequencing to identify targets on chromatin. Importantly, all of these methods only allow analysis of one known RNA at a time, and up to date, a global view is lacking on all RNA-chromatin interactions, which is critical to address a wide range of functional genomics questions.

Amplifying and Detecting Nucleic Acids Within Crude Samples

Diagnosing diseases or determining compound safety often relies on bioassays to detect foreign nucleic acids (biomarkers) in crude biological, environmental, or pharmaceutical samples involving sample preprocessing which can be insensitive, timely, and expensive. The invention provides methods, systems, and compositions for amplifying, detecting, and quantifying nucleic acids from crude samples.

Homogenous Entropy-Driven Biomolecular Assay (HEBA)

Professors in the UCLA Department of Bioengineering have developed a novel short oligonucleotide assay to fluorescently detect biomolecules.

Drop-Carrier Particles For Digital Assays

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a novel drop-carrier particle for single cell or single molecule assays.

Low Cost Wireless Spirometer Using Acoustic Modulation

The present invention relates to portable Spirometry system that uses sound to transmit pulmonary airflow information to a receiver.

Microfluidic Component Package

The present invention describes a component package that enables a microfluidic device to be fixed to a Printed Circuit Board (PCB) or other substrate, and embedded within a larger microfluidic system.

Method and System for Ultra High Dynamic Range Nucleic Acid Quantification

Researchers at UC Irvine developed a device and method that combines the high dynamic range and high accuracy of digital PCR (dPCR) with the real-time analysis of quantitative PCR (qPCR) to achieve a ultra-high dynamic range PCR over 10 to 12 orders of magnitude. The present method is accomplished by a highly integrated design that optimally packs, thermocycles, and images as many as 1 million reaction vessels.

Antisense Oligonucleotides and Drug Conjugates for Obesity and Diabetes Treatment

The obesity epidemic is an ongoing issue leading to significant economic and social burden, in part due to its role in the development of diabetes. Only three DFA-approved drugs for obesity treatment currently exist, none of which are without significant side effects and risks. Researchers at UCI have developed a DNA-based approach that activates metabolism, to target genes only in the fat and liver, causing increased energy expenditure and weight loss without affecting other organs. These present a viable approach to obesity treatment with minimal side effects in comparison to current drug treatments.

An Antibody to Phospho T3 of Human Huntingtin

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative genetic disorder caused by abnormal function of mutated Huntingtin protein. The invention uncovers an antibody to a new post-translational modification site that affects human Huntingtin aggregation and pathogenesis of HD.

Nanowire Building Block

Nanowires have applications as transistors or bioelectronic devices. Current methods to synthesize nanowires lack the ability to precisely control length, sequence, and terminal functionality. Using this invention as a building block, organic nanowires can be made with controlled length, sequence, and terminal functionality. The organic nanowires made with this invention also exhibit zero-resistance and do not degrade with increased length.

Soluble Fluorescent DNA Label

Assays or biosensors that utilize electrochemical or fluorescent techniques often employ DNA electrochemical probes. Current probes have drawbacks, as they have either electronic or fluorescent properties, are not readily water-soluble, and are poorly coupled within a DNA strand. This invention is a DNA electrochemical probe that has both electronic and fluorescent properties, is water-soluble, and can readily incorporate into a DNA strand.

DNA Amplification by Electric Field Cycling (efc-PCR)

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a popular technique for amplifying and quantifying minute quantities of DNA. Technologies based on PCR are used for a wide range of applications, including forensics, disease detection, and laboratory tools. Researchers at UCI have developed a device that can implement a novel method for PCR based on voltage cycling as opposed to temperature cycling (the current method for PCR). This allows the device to be much more portable and compact than those currently available.

Therapeutic strategies for Huntington’s Disease using stop codon suppression

In Huntington’s Disease (HD), aberrant splicing of the huntingtin protein can produce a highly toxic peptide that accumulates in the brain. The invention describes methods to minimize the toxicity of spliced proteins.

Enhanced Cell/Bead Encapsulation Via Acoustic Focusing

The invention consists of a multi-channel, droplet-generating microfluidic device with a strategically placed feature. The feature vibrates in order to counteract particle-trapping micro-vortices formed in the device. Counteracting these vortices allows for single particle encapsulation in the droplets formed by the device and makes this technology a good candidate for use in single cell diagnostics and drug delivery systems.

Aptamers that promote neuronal growth by binding to and blocking the protein Nogo

Neuronal growth inhibiting protein (Nogo), blocks regrowth of damaged neuronal projections (axons) in neurodegenerative disorders. Currently, researchers are developing antibody proteins to inhibit Nogo and produce axon regrowth in a variety of disorders. However, such antibodies are unstable and costly to synthesize. At UCI, the synthesis of nucleic acid molecules called aptamers that selectively bind and block Nogo to promote axonal growth presents a promising alternative pharmaceutical target for treating a range of disorders including spinal cord injury, stroke, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), and Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

An Integrated Microfluidic Platform For Selective Extraction Of Single-Cell mRNA

The invention is a high-density, single-cell trapping array. A specialized probe tip can be precisely manipulated to non-destructively collect targeted intracellular material from the trapped cells for measurements. Due to the non-destructive nature of the invention, the integrity and function of the trapped cells can be preserved and they can be monitored over time to better understand disease processes.

Novel Method for Finding Low Abundance Sequences By Hybridization

This invention describes a novel method for enriching rare sequences in nucleic acid libraries.

RNA-directed Cleavage and Modification of DNA using CasY (CRISPR-CasY)

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} The CRISPR-Cas system is now understood to confer bacteria and archaea with acquired immunity against phage and viruses. CRISPR-Cas systems consist of Cas proteins, which are involved in acquisition, targeting and cleavage of foreign DNA or RNA, and a CRISPR array, which includes direct repeats flanking short spacer sequences that guide Cas proteins to their targets.  Class 2 CRISPR-Cas are streamlined versions in which a single Cas protein bound to RNA is responsible for binding to and cleavage of a targeted sequence. The programmable nature of these minimal systems has facilitated their use as a versatile technology that is revolutionizing the field of genome manipulation.  Current CRISPR Cas technologies are based on systems from cultured bacteria, leaving untapped the vast majority of organisms that have not been isolated.  There is a need in the art for additional Class 2 CRISPR/Cas systems (e.g., Cas protein plus guide RNA combinations).     UC Berkeley researchers discovered a new type of Cas protein, CasY.  CasY is short compared to previously identified CRISPR-Cas endonucleases, and thus use of this protein as an alternative provides the advantage that the nucleotide sequence encoding the protein is relatively short.  CasY utilizes a guide RNA to perform double stranded cleavage of DNA. The researchers introduced CRISPR-CasY into E. coli, finding that they could block genetic material introduced into the cell.  Further research results indicated that CRISPR-CasY operates in a manner analogous to CRISPR-Cas9, but utilizing an entirely distinct protein architecture containing different catalytic domains.   CasY is also expected to function under different conditions (e.g., temperature) given the environment of the organisms that CasY was expressed in.  Similar to CRISPR Cas9, CasY enzymes are expected to have a wide variety of applications in genome editing and nucleic acid manipulation.   

RNA-directed Cleavage and Modification of DNA using CasX (CRISPR-CasX)

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} The CRISPR-Cas system is now understood to confer bacteria and archaea with acquired immunity against phage and viruses. CRISPR-Cas systems consist of Cas proteins, which are involved in acquisition, targeting and cleavage of foreign DNA or RNA, and a CRISPR array, which includes direct repeats flanking short spacer sequences that guide Cas proteins to their targets.  Class 2 CRISPR-Cas are streamlined versions in which a single Cas protein bound to RNA is responsible for binding to and cleavage of a targeted sequence. The programmable nature of these minimal systems has facilitated their use as a versatile technology that is revolutionizing the field of genome manipulation.  Current CRISPR Cas technologies are based on systems from cultured bacteria, leaving untapped the vast majority of organisms that have not been isolated.  There is a need in the art for additional Class 2 CRISPR/Cas systems (e.g., Cas protein plus guide RNA combinations).   UC Berkeley researchers discovered a new type of Cas protein, CasX, from groundwater samples. CasX is short compared to previously identified CRISPR-Cas endonucleases, and thus use of this protein as an alternative provides the advantage that the nucleotide sequence encoding the protein is relatively short.  CasX utilizes a tracrRNA and a guide RNA to perform double stranded cleavage of DNA. The researchers introduced CRISPR-CasX into E. coli, finding that they could block genetic material introduced into the cell.  Further research results indicated that CRISPR-CasX operates in a manner analogous to CRISPR-Cas9, but utilizing an entirely distinct protein architecture containing different catalytic domains.   CasX is also expected to function under different conditions (e.g., temperature) given the environment of the organisms that CasX was expressed in.  Similar to CRISPR Cas9, CasX enzymes are expected to have a wide variety of applications in genome editing and nucleic acid manipulation. 

Enzymatic Synthesis Of Cyclic Dinucleotides

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} GGDEF domain-containing enzymes are diguanylate cyclases that produce cyclic di-GMP (cdiG), a second messenger that modulates the key bacterial lifestyle transition from a motile to sessile biofilm-forming state. The ubiquity of genes encoding GGDEF proteins in bacterial genomes has established the dominance of cdiG signaling in bacteria. A subfamily of GGDEF enzymes synthesizes the asymmetric signaling molecule cyclic AMP-GMP. Hybrid CDN-producing and promiscuous substrate-binding (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes are widely distributed and found in other deltaproteobacteria and have roles that include regulation of cAG signaling.  GGDEF enzymes that produce cyclic dinucleotides are especially of interest.    UC Berkeley researcher have developed a new method of preparing and using cyclic dinucleotides (CDNs) by contacting a CDN producing-enzyme (e.g., a GGDEF enzyme) with a precursor of a CDN under conditions sufficient to convert the precursor into a CDN. This method produces a variety of non-naturally occurring, asymmetric and symmetric CDNs and can be performed in vitro or in a genetically modified host cell. Also provided are CDN compositions that find use in a variety of applications such as modulating an immune response in an individual.  

A non-destructive method of quantifying mRNA in a single living cell

The detection of levels of messenger RNA (mRNA), the molecule used by DNA to convey information about protein production, is a very important method in molecular biology. Current detection strategies, such as Northern Blotting and RT-PCR, require destruction of the cell to extract such information. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a method to non-destructively assess mRNA levels in a single living cell.

Directed Evolution Of AAV Vectors That Undergo Retrograde Axonal Transport

Brain functions such as perception, cognition, and the control of movement depend on the coordinated action of large-scale neuronal networks, which are composed of local circuit modules that are linked together by long-range connections.  Such long­ range connections are formed by specialized projection neurons that often comprise several intermingled classes, each projecting to a different downstream target within the network. Projection neurons have also been implicated in the spread of several neurodegenerative diseases. Selective targeting of projection neurons for transgene delivery is important both for gaining insights into brain function and for therapeutic intervention in neurodegenerative diseases.   Viral vectors constitute an important class of tools for introducing transgenes into specific neuronal populations, but their potential for biological investigation and gene therapy is hampered by excessive virulence.  Other viruses can infect neurons when administered directly to the nervous system, with "pseudorabies", adenoviruses and lentiviruses used most commonly in animal research. However, these viruses mediate only modest levels of transgene expression, have potential for toxicity, and are currently not easily scalable for clinical or large animal studies.  Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs) are an effective platform for in vivo gene therapy, as they mediate high-level transgene expression, are non-toxic, and evoke minimal immune responses.  rAAVs have allowed retrograde access to projection neurons, but their natural propensity for retrograde transport is low, hampering efforts to address the role of projection neurons in circuit computations or disease progression.    UCB and HHMI researchers have produced a new rAAV variant (rAAV2-retro) that permits robust retrograde access to projection neurons with efficiency comparable to classical synthetic retrograde labeling reagents.  The rAAV2-retro gene delivery system can be used on its own or in conjunction with Cre recombinase driver lines to achieve long-term, high-level transgene expression that is sufficient for effective functional interrogation of neural circuit function, as well as for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated and other genome editing in targeted neuronal populations.  As such, this designer variant of adeno-associated virus allows for efficient mapping, monitoring, and manipulation of projection neurons.

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