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Buried Tunnel Junction Aperture For III-Nitride Surface-Emitting Lasers

A buried tunnel junction (BTJ) device that further improves VCSEL performance through both current and optical confinement.

Group-III Containing Source Material For Bulk Nitride Solution Growth

A method for producing low-cost Group-III source materials.

Tunable Thz Generation In Chip-Scale Graphene

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel tunable and efficient terahertz (THz) plasmon generation on-chip via graphene monolayers.

Continous Tuning Of Semiconductor Lasers

A method for continuous tuning of an integrated, solid-state semiconductor laser.

Crystal Orientation Optimized Optical Frequency Shifter

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an optimized frequency shifter and polarization converter for power reduction.

Ultra-High Resolution Multi-Platform Heterodyne Optical Imaging

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a new technique for achieving ultra-high resolution heterodyne synthetic imaging across multiple platforms (e.g. multiple satellites) using optical frequency comb sources.

Determining Oil Well Connectivity Using Nanoparticles

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Department of Math, and California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) have designed methods and systems for monitoring and testing underground wells using sampled nanowires.

Unipolar Light Emitting Devices On Silicon Based Substrates

A process that provides a less expensive alternative for growing light emitting material compared to growing on lattice matched native III-V substrates.

Stable Tunable Arbitrary Frequency Generator

An approach to mitigate performance loss in widely-tunable radiofrequency and terahertz signal generation devices while generating frequencies above the terahertz band

Method and apparatus for three-dimensional imaging of molecular bonds

Researchers at UCI have developed a 3D imaging technique with sub-nanometer resolution, which allows for imaging of individual bonds within molecules. Visualization and measurements taken at this resolution provide new and profound information about the fundamental aspects of atomic structures and their consequences on chemical activity.

All Microwave Stabilization Of Chip-Scale Frequency Combs

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed an optical frequency comb technology using small, cheap components for high precision time, frequency, distance, and energy measurements.

Resolution Enhancement Method For Mm-Wave/Terahertz Imaging

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed an imaging method based on low-cost CMOS process technologies showing enhanced resolution as high as 1.4THz.

All microwave stabilization of chip-scale frequency combs for high precision measurements

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed an optical frequency comb technology using small, cheap components for high precision time, frequency, distance, and energy measurements.

Apparatus And Method For Multiple-Pulse Impulsive Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed an apparatus and method for multiple-pulse impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy for molecule structure-level characterization.

Apparatus And Method For Optically Amplified Multi-Dimensional Spectrally Encoded Imaging

Scientists at UCLA have developed an advanced optical imaging technique that uses spectral brushes to capture image data across an entire sample area at once, a technique that enables faster imaging and higher sensitivity over current methods.

Low-Cost, Highly Scalable Solution for Integration of Laser or Light Sources with Silicon Photonic Circuitry

A low-cost, highly scalable approach to integrating a compound-semiconductor laser or light source with silicon-photonic circuitry.

External Cavity Laser Based Upon Metasurfaces

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a novel approach for terahertz (THz) quantum-cascade (QC) lasers to achieve scalable output power, high quality diffraction limited, and directive output beams.

Method To Characterize Cut Gemstones Using Optical Coherence Tomography

The invention uses optical coherence tomography to created a three-dimensional map of cut gemstones, both loose and in settings. This map will provide gemologists with information about the location and characteristics of defects, as well as providing a more accurate measure of weight for cut gemstones that are analyzed in their settings. This information can be used to accurately determine the overall quality and monetary value of cut gemstones.

Method For Imaging Neurotransmitters In Vitro and In Vivo Using Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

Neurotransmitters play a central role in complex neural networks by serving as chemical units of neuronal communication.  Quantitative optical methods for the detection of changes in neurotransmitter levels has the potential to profoundly increase our understanding of how the brain works. Therapeutic drugs that target neurotransmitter release are used ubiquitously to treat a vast array of brain and behavioral disorders.  For example, new methods in this sphere could provide a new platform by which to validate the function of drugs that alter modulatory neurotransmission, or to screen antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs.  However, currently in neuroscience, few optical methods exist that can detect neurotransmitters with high spatial and temporal resolution in vitro or in vivo.  Brain tissue also readily scatters visible wavelengths of light currently used to perform biological imaging, and neuronal tissue and has an abundance of biomolecules that are chemically or structurally similar and therefore hard to specifically distinguish.  Furthermore, neurotransmission relevant processes occur at challenging spatial  and temporal scales.    UC Berkeley investigators have developed polymer-functionalized carbon nanotubes for in vitro and in vivo quantification of extracellular modulatory neurotransmitter levels using optical detectors. The method uses the fluorescent optical properties of polymer-functionalized carbon nanotubes to selectively report changes in concentration of specific neurotransmitters. The scheme is novel in that the detection method applies to wide variety of specific neurotransmitters, it is an optical method and therefore gives greater spatial information, and enables the potential for imaging of one or more neurotransmitters. The optical method also produces less damage to the surrounding tissue than methods that implant electrodes or cells and allows high resolution localization with other methods of optical investigation. The invention takes advantage of favorable fluorescence properties of carbon nanotubes, such as carbon nanotube emission in the near infrared and infinite fluorescence lifetime.  The near infrared emission scatters less than shorter wavelengths, enabling greater signal recovery from deeper tissue, and allows greater compatibility with other techniques. The optical properties also enable long term potentially even chronic use. 

Photophysically Innocent Boron Cluster Ligand Scaffolds For Organic Light Emitting Diode Materials

UCLA researchers have developed a novel method to using boron clusters ligands for light emitting diode materials. This is the first report of the ligand 1,1’-bis-o-carborane (bc) bound to Pt(N^N). Both C-Pt symmetrical isomers and C-Pt/B-Pt asymmetric isomers can be synthesized.

Broadband Surface-Enhanced Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (SECARS) With High Spectral Resolution

UCLA researchers have developed a novel method to improve Raman spectroscopy sensitivity, spatio-temporal resolution, and broadband spectral range while reducing peak power and photo-damage.

Safe And Targeted Electric Stimulation Of The Human Cranial Nerves

Neuromodulation (electrical stimulation of the nervous system) is used in cochlear and retinal implants, or deep brain stimulation devices to treat various neurological disorders (i.e. depression, Parkinson’s Disease). However, such approaches tend to be invasive and expensive. Researchers at UCI have developed a novel approach and device to stimulate the cranial nerves that is targeted, safe, and minimally-invasive for the treatment of diseases or the activation of senses.

Direct Optical Visualization Of Graphene On Transparent Substrates

96 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} The ∼10% optical contrast of graphene on specialized substrates like oxide-capped silicon substrates, together with the high-throughput and noninvasive features of optical microscopy, have greatly facilitated the use and research of graphene research for the past decade.  However, substantially lower contrast is obtained on transparent substrates. Visualization of nanoscale defects in graphene, e.g., voids, cracks, wrinkles, and multilayers, formed during either growth or subsequent transfer and fabrication steps, represents yet another level of challenge for most device substrates.     UC Berkeley researchers have developed a facile, label-free optical microscopy method to directly visualize graphene on transparent inorganic and polymer substrates at 30−40% image contrast per graphene layer.  Their noninvasive approach overcomes typical challenges associated with transparent substrates, including insulating and rough surfaces, enables unambiguous identification of local graphene layer numbers and reveals nanoscale structures and defects with outstanding contrast and throughput. We thus demonstrate in situ monitoring of nanoscale defects in graphene, including the generation of nano-cracks under uniaxial strain, at up to 4× video rate.  

Multi-Material Window/Skylight Treatment Addresses Dynamic Occupant Needs and External Conditions

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a unique multi-material rolling system for window and skylight applications that addresses the dynamic nature of external conditions and varying needs of indoor occupants.

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