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Axi-Symmetric Small-Footprint Gyroscope With Interchangeable Whole-Angle And Rate Operation

The invention is a compact, degenerate mode gyroscope capable of achieving high Q-factor in both whole-angle and rate operation modes.

Artificial cornea implant using nanopatterned synthetic polymer

The device is an artificial corneal implant comprised of a single, nanopatterned material. The device is durable, easy to implant, and robust against bacterial infection and other problems associated with other state-of-the-art ocular devices.

Synthesis Technique to Achieve High-Anisotropy FeNi

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed an innovative synthesis approach to achieve high anisotropy L1 FeNi by combining physical vapor deposition and a high speed rapid thermal annealing (RTA).

Building blocks for 3D, modular microfluidics

Researchers at the University of CA, Irvine have developed modular microfluidic platforms consisting of microfluidic building blocks that can be connected in various configurations to construct complete microfluidic devices for different applications.

A Micro/Nanobubble Oxygenated Solutions for Wound Healing and Tissue Preservation

Soft-tissue injuries and organ transplantation are common in modern combat scenarios. Organs and tissues harvested for transplantation need to be preserved during transport, which can be very difficult. Micro and nanobubbles (MNBs) offer a new technology that could supply oxygenation to such tissues prior to transplantation, thus affording better recovery and survival of patients. Described here is a novel device capable of producing MNB solutions that can be used to preserve viability and function of such organs/tissue. Additionally, these solutions may be used with negative pressure wound therapy to heal soft-tissue wounds.

Enhanced Cycle Lifetime With Gel Electrolyte For Mn02 Nanowire Capacitors

The invention is novel way of preparing electrodes for nanowire-based batteries and capacitors with extremely long cycle lifetimes. The proposed assemblies last much longer than any comparable state of the art nanowire energy storage device, without loss of performance, and are comparable to liquid electrolyte-based technologies in terms of their figures of merit.

Finite-State Machines For DNA Information Storage

DNA can store petabytes of information per gram and can last intact for tens of thousands of years.  This makes it an appealing prospect for long-term archival storage.  However, DNA synthesis, sequencing, and replication are prone to errors, which limit its potential as a storage medium.  These errors can be controlled by applying the tools of information theory, treating DNA storage as a noisy channel coding problem.  Several coding schemes for DNA storage have been proposed that address the interrelated issues of error avoidance, error correction and redundancy.  There are currently no schemes that address all the above.    Researchers at UC Berkeley have combine some of these ideas, and introduced new ones, using a modular strategy for code design.  With this method, codes can be assembled to meet requirements including error-avoidance, error-correction (resistant to corruption of the information by substitutions, insertions, duplications, or deletions that are introduced during sequencing or replication of the DNA), and demarcation of metadata.  The DNA generated by the codes is free of short local repeats and other (foldback) structure.  The codes generated by this method are flexible in that they arise by systematic combination of state machines, each machine formally representing a particular transformation of the input sequence.  So, for example, one state machine might be used to introduce a "watermark" signal that helps protect against insertion/deletion errors; another state machine could be used to convert the binary sequence into a ternary sequence (or mixed-radix sequence); another state machine would convert the ternary or mixed-radix sequence into a non-repeating DNA sequence; and another state machine to model the errors that are introduced during sequencing. 

Pyrite Shrink-Wrap Laminate As A Hydroxyl Radical Generator

The invention is a diagnostic technology, as well as a research and development tool. It is a simple, easy to operate, and effective platform for the analysis of pharmaceuticals and biological species. Specifically, this platform generates hydroxyl radicals for oxidative footprinting – a technique commonly employed in protein mapping and analysis. The platform itself is inexpenisve to fabricate, scalable, and requires nothing more than an ordinary pipet to use. In addition, it is highly amenable to scale-up, multiplexing, and automation, and so it holds promise as a high-throughput method for mapping protein structure in support of product development, validation, and regulatory approval in the protein-based therapeutics industry.

Monoclonal Antibody Against Cer164 (Clone 11)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human centrosomal protein 164kDa (Cep164). This antibody binds to the phosphorylation site of Cep164 and has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against ATR-IP (Clone 5)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human ATR-interacting protein (ATR-IP). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against Cer164 (Clone 26)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human centrosomal protein 164kDa (Cep164). This antibody binds to the phosphorylation site of Cep164 and has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against PNPase (Clone 4C11)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human mitochondrial polyribonucleotide nucleotidyltransferase 1 (PNPase). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against Pnpase (Clone 2A2)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human mitochondrial polyribonucleotide nucleotidyltransferase 1 (PNPase). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibodies Against Spc24/25 (Clone 2A10)

Mouse hybridoma cell line secret antibody against the human Kinetochore protein Spc24 (SPC24) and Kinetochore protein Spc25 (SPC25). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibodies Against Spc24/25 (Clone 2C8)

Mouse hybridoma cell line secret antibody against the human Kinetochore protein Spc24 (SPC24) and Kinetochore protein Spc25 (SPC25). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Method to Fabricate Josephson Junctions

Brief description not available

Potential Driven Electrochemical Modification of Tissue

Researchers at UC Irvine have developed a minimally invasive technology that uses electrical potentials to perform a variety of to modify and reshape soft tissues such as cartilage

Microfluidic System for Particle Trapping and Separation

<p>Researchers have developed a novel system and method to rapidly separate particles from liquid. This technology demonstrates lab-on-a-chip potential for particle separation and/or purification. This technology is capable of processing a wide variety of molecules, ranging from cells to smaller biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acid. Applications of this technology include (but are not limited) use of it for particle separation and quantification for assays, cell preparation, and cell lysing and component separation.</p>

Microfluidic System for Particle Trapping and Separation

Researchers have developed a novel system and method to rapidly separate particles from liquid. This technology demonstrates lab-on-a-chip potential for particle separation and/or purification. This technology is capable of processing a wide variety of molecules, ranging from cells to smaller biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acid. Applications of this technology include (but are not limited) use of it for particle separation and quantification for assays, cell preparation, and cell lysing and component separation.

Monoclonal Antibody against ATR-IP (Clone 11)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human ATR-interacting protein (ATR-IP). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against CEP164 (Clone 13)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human centrosomal protein 164kDa (Cep164). This antibody binds to the phosphorylation site of Cep164 and has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against CEP164 (Clone 17)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human centrosomal protein 164kDa (Cep164). This antibody binds to the phosphorylation site of Cep164 and has been tested for use in immunoprecipitation and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibodies Against Chk2 (Clone 4B8)

Mouse monoclonal antibody (clone 4B8) against the human Serine/threonine-protein kinase Chk2. This antibody has been tested for use in immunoprecipitation and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibodies Against Mtpap (Clone 1D3)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human Poly (A) RNA polymerase, mitochondrial (mtPAP). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot.

Monoclonal Antibody Against mtPAP (Clone 3D2)

Mouse monoclonal antibody against the human Poly (A) RNA polymerase, mitochondrial (mtPAP). This antibody has been tested for use in immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and western blot. .

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