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Peripheral Nerve Repair By Peptide Amphiphile Nanofibers.

UCLA researchers in the Department of Surgery have developed a novel method that promotes directed nerve growth and peripheral nerve regeneration using peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers. The combination of conduit and PA nanofiber scaffold offers greater success than currently used methods of bridging with empty conduits. This novel approach may become a substitute for nerve graft for clinical use in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries.

Holographic Opto-Fluidic Microscopy

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a system for holographic opto-fluidic microscopy.

High-Throughput And Label-Free Single Nanoparticle Sizing Based On Time-Resolved On-Chip Microscopy

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a rapid, low-cost, and label-free methodology for nanoparticle sizing.

Rapid, Portable And Cost-Effective Yeast Cell Viability And Concentration Analysis Using Lensfree On-Chip Microscopy And Machine Learning

UCLA researchers in the Department of Electrical Engineering have developed a new portable device to rapidly measure yeast cell viability and concentration using a lab-on-chip design.

Process For Recycling Surfactant In Nanoemulsion Production

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a novel method to separate and recycle surfactants used in the manufacturing of nanoemulsions.

Mechanical Process For Creating Particles Using Two Plates

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry & Physics and Astronomy have developed a novel method to lithograph two polished solid surfaces by using a simple mechanical alignment jig with piezoelectric control and a method of pressing them together and solidifying a material.

A General Method For Designing Self-Assembling Protein Nanomaterials

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry have developed a novel computational method for designing proteins that self-assemble to a desired symmetric architecture. This method combines symmetrical docking with interface design, and it can be used to design a wide variety of self-assembling protein nanomaterials. 

Quantum Dot Incorporated Bacillus Spore As Nanosensor For Viral Detection

Researchers at UCLA and collaborating institutions have developed a simple and high-throughput method for preparing spore-based monodisperse microparticles (SMMs) from Bacillus subtilis. This new method enables them to form nanocomposites of CdTe quantum dot (QD)-loaded SMMs in a greener, more cost-effective manner.

Nanotherapeutic For Treating Infections Caused By Intracellular And Extracellular Pathogens Ii

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Department of Medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine have developed a new nanotherapeutic for the treatment of intracellular and extracellular pathogens.

Drop-Carrier Particles For Digital Assays

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed a novel drop-carrier particle for single cell or single molecule assays.

Growth-Factor Nanocapsules With Tunable Release Capability For Bone Regeneration

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Chemical Engineering and Orthopedic Surgery have developed a method to deliver therapeutic proteins directly to the tumor site using nanocapsules.

High Performance and Flexible Chemical And Bio Sensors Using Metal Oxide Semiconductors

UCLA researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a simple method producing thin, sensitive In2O3-based conformal biosensors based on field-effect transistors using facile solution-based processing for future wearable human technologies as well as non-invasive glucose testing.

Protein Nanocapsules With Detachable Zwitterionic Coating For Protein Delivery

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering have developed a method to deliver therapeutic proteins directly to the tumor site using nanocapsules.

Evaporation-Based Method For Manufacturing And Recycling Of Metal Matrix Nanocomposites

UCLA researchers in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have developed a new method to manufacture and recycle metal matrix nanocomposites.

New Method to Increase the Rate of Protein Ligation Catalyzed by the S. Aureus Sortase A Enzyme

UCLA researchers in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a new method to increase the rate of ligation catalyzed by the S. aureus Sortase A enzyme

Enhanced Fluorescence Readout And Reduced Inhibition For Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests

UCLA researchers in the Department of Bioengineering have developed an enhanced fluorescent detection method for nucleic acid amplification tests.

New 3D-Exoquant Method For The Analysis Of Surface Molecules And Quantification Of Tissue-Specific Exosomes In Biological Fluids

UCLA researchers in the Department of Neurology have developed a novel high sensitivity exosome and extracellular vesicle disease detection technology for use in the clinical and research setting. 

UCLA Inventors Create Platform Technology to Create Customizable Nanoscale Wound Management Tools

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Chemistry, Physics, and Bioengineering, led by Dr. Tim Deming of the Bioengineering department, have developed a platform to create and modify nanoscale vesicles and hydrogels for use in wound management. The poly-peptide based platforms created by the Deming group are customizable in nearly all physical characteristics, can be tailored in size, be loaded with hydrophobic, hydrophilic, or cellular payloads, adaptable to specific delivery locations, low toxicity, are fully synthetic, possess highly reproducible properties, and are inexpensive to prepare compared to solid-phase peptide synthesis. The platform can be used to create novel, need-based nanoscale vesicles or injectable hydrogels, and can be used to augment existing material systems.

UCLA Inventors Create Platform Technology to Create Customizable Nanoscale Particles and Gels for Use in the Industrial Biomaterials Market

UCLA researchers in the Departments of Chemistry, Physics, and Bioengineering, led by Dr. Tim Deming of the Bioengineering department, have developed a platform to create and modify nanoscale particles and gels for use in the industrial biomaterials market. The polypeptide based delivery vehicle platforms created by the Deming group are customizable in nearly all physical characteristics, can be tailored in size, loaded with hydrophobic and hydrophilic payloads, used in coatings, are fully synthetic, possess highly reproducible properties, and are inexpensive to prepare compared to solid-phase peptide synthesis.The platform can be used to create novel, need-based nanoscale vesicles or injectable hydrogels, and can also be used to augment existing materials systems.

Activating HIV Latency Using Drug Encapsulated Nanoparticles

UCLA researchers in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics have devised a novel method to target the HIV virus in patients using nanoparticles loaded with therapeutic agents.

Single-Molecular Homogenous Amplified Detection in Confined Volumes

This novel method detects the concentration of molecules of interest without washing steps or any solid-phase reaction.

On-Demand Drug Release System for In Vivo Cancer Treatment via Self-Assembled Magnetic Nanoparticles

Researchers at UCLA have utilized magnetothermally responsive self-assembled nanoparticle technology for highly effective in vivo cancer treatment. The present invention will lead to a more personalized and effective approach in the field of cancer treatment.

Method of Making Multicomponent Nanoemulsions

Researchers from UCLA’s Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry have developed a novel method of making deformable, multicomponent oil-in-water nanoemulsions to create a single delivery system for multiple drugs or other insoluble molecules.  

Assessing the Toxic Potential of Materials at the Nanolevel

UCLA researchers in the Department of Medicine have developed a comprehensive cellular toxicological screening protocol to speed up the evaluation and hazard ranking of large categories of engineered nanomaterials; this methodology can also be adapted to perform high throughput screening of redox active nanomaterials with the potential to build predictive toxicological paradigms for regulatory purposes.

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